Public Interest Management Group and the Nonprofit Association of Oregon partnered on a research study on best management practices. We wanted to find out how practitioners felt about the study’s findings. So, we set up a series of six focus groups in diverse geographies across Oregon. Several important themes emerged from these discussions.

Jim Collins’ book Good to Great introduced a powerful concept in management management strategy. Named for the humble, nocturnal hedgehog, which has sustained as a species for millions of years, the book is as relevant as ever. The Hedgehog Concept can be valuable for nonprofits, and in this entry I talk about why.

Trump is our asteroid. The questions nonprofit leaders need to ask are: Can we adapt rapidly?  And, if not, will our organization become irrelevant?  Adaptation may require rapid deployment of new programs, immediate expansion or reallocation of resources, engagement with new partners, or mobilizing constituents in short order.  Resilient organizations will survive, and may even be stronger when this chapter ends.

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AuthorScott Schaffer

Now, more than ever, all nonprofits need to engage in advocacy as a strategy to serve their communities and support their missions. Contrary to a widely-held myth, 501(c)(3) organizations are not prohibited from advocacy. Further, nonprofits are vital intermediaries in the public policy process. Here I offer 4 practical ways mission-based organizations can incorporate advocacy into their work.

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AuthorScott Schaffer

Over 61 million people voted for a would-be strongman, who conveyed a charismatic, hyper-masculine style. Does this in reality translate into effective leadership? A growing body of research suggests it does not. Public Interest Management Group's own applied research shows that externally-focused nonprofit CEOs do not, in fact, have greater success than internally-focused counterparts. Strong leadership can take many forms, and we - nonprofit search committees and voters - need to look beyond cliches and gut reactions in identifying effective leaders.

Posted
AuthorScott Schaffer