Many great nonprofits work their magic largely behind the scenes. Farmers markets offer an excellent example of nonprofit enterprises at work, and the state of Washington has two of the best in the business: the Neighborhood Farmers Market Alliance, and Washington State Farmers Market Association. Both of these PIMG clients are efficient, effective, and striving for bigger things in the future.

Just like you and me, organizations and their employees will stagnate if they don’t learn, grow and evolve as the world around us changes... What drives evolution?  One driver, we can hypothesize, is becoming a “learning organization,” with the ability to gather and process data, and using this information to adapt.  In other words, learning manifests itself through informed decisions and constant adaptation to a changing environment.

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AuthorScott Schaffer

Having a strategic plan in and of itself does show a statistical correlation with success. Public Interest Management Group has studied a variety of nonprofit organizational success factors, part of our Success Factor Analysis methodology. The most successful organizations are clear about what they’re trying to accomplish and why, and the validity of the methods they’re employing. 

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AuthorScott Schaffer

PIMG client Washington Water Trust is an organization that uses creative approaches to preserve streamflow, restore habitat and fight back against drought conditions. The nonprofit's leadership has recognized a need to grow to meet needs that are expected to increase in the years and decades ahead. Public Interest Management Group worked with the Water Trust to develop a business plan for growth through the sizzling summer—a backdrop that could not have been more dramatic. 

Managing a baseball team has a lot more in common with managing an organization than you might think. We fondly recall Gene Mauch, a manager known for two things: introduction of enduring innovations into his profession, and  season-ruining catastrophes on the field . Brilliant tactics aren't always enough, and we can learn from summers past, good and bad.

Posted
AuthorScott Schaffer