Merger and Restructuring Strategy

In a constantly changing world, you need to consider alternatives that can improve your impact, efficiency and sustainability. Adjusting your organization's structure can be a bridge to a new future. Nonprofits have many options to consider. Public Interest Management Group has a systematic approach for helping you evaluate alternatives and identify the right restructuring strategy. 

There are two general types of restructuring alternatives—one looks outside, and the other inside the agency: 

Explore PIMG's Approach to Merger and Restructuring

Explore PIMG's Approach to Merger and Restructuring

Strategic Partnership

Merger is the most familiar type of union between nonprofits. But did you know that it's just one of a range of partnership options nonprofits can consider? Others include:

  • Strategic alliance
  • Administrative consolidation
  • Joint venture
  • Merger with local autonomy.

PIMG offers several services around organizational partnership:

  • Feasibility analysis
  • Facilitation of negotiations
  • Financial due diligence
  • Integration planning.

The specific combination depends on your needs.

Internal Restructuring

Change can come from within your organization too. Many nonprofits face financial or operational challenges, and internal reorganization can be an effective and straightforward solution. Options may include: 

  • Downsizing
  • Outsourcing
  • Spinning off assets or transferring programs
  • Enhancing profit-centers
  • Redesigning staff structure and management relationships.

We design and test restructuring alternatives using financial-operational modeling and a guided decision-making process that gives you the hard facts you need for decision-making.

Contact us for more details. 

 
 

 
The Public Interest Management Group team knew the full range of issues we needed to negotiate, kept both teams focused on our goals, and worked behind the scenes to prepare us for success. The process was inclusive, and respectful of the emotional nature of merger discussions.
— Rachel, Capital Impact Partners